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Salkantay Trek Frequently Asked Questions

23 Oct

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WHY QUECHUAS EXPEDITIONS? The Best Local Tour Operator.

Proper Porter Treatment 2015 – 2016 Very Important!!! click here

• Under Inca Trail and Alternative Treks Local Guides Management (100% Peruvian People)
• 13 years of Experience specializing in Tourism in Cusco, Peru.
• We have Many Real travelers reviews and Highly Recommended by Lonely Planet, Trip Advisor, Frommers & South American Explorer Club. (Please, Click at here Quechuas Expeditions)
So why you are Looking at the Rest when you have the Best…
• The Best Local Tour Operator in Cusco, Peru.
• Small group specialists (02 people Minimum Average 06 ppl. & 08 people Maximum) but can cater for large groups
• Official licensed Local Tour Operator on the Classic Inca Trail, Alternative Inca Treks to Machupicchu and Jungle Tours
• “we don’t pass our passengers to other cheap agencies as most travel agencies do here. they will re-sell you to other cheap companies.
• We never share service with other agencies” thats why they dont have the control of the service because they share porters(Porters overloaded) cook, transport, guide and other things once you are on the inca trail, we depart with 02 people Minimum & our Maximum 08 people (Note: Typical Group Size 4 to 6 people)
• Highly Experienced Professional Quechua, Spanish, English speaking guides
• High quality, safe, fun and environmentally friendly tours
• We Support Sustainable, Responsible & Ethical Tourism…
• Dedicated to high quality service Brand new Camping, Biking Equipment and Private Land Transportation
• Respect for culture and nature / environmental consciousness and conservation.
• We are the most reliable company in the business
PROMPERU (Peruvian Goverment Official Website)
• Responsible Tourism and Well-paid and well-treated porters (Inca Trail agencies fined for not paying minimum wage to the porters click here)
• Personal treatment, Enthusiastic, experienced and well-trained employees who speak fluent English and French
• Shared passion for travel, Payable tours
• 5% of our profit we donate and it benefits to these Quechuas communities where our inca trail porters live canacchimpa, Huarocondo.

– What is the Maximum & Minimum Quechuas Expeditions Group Size?
We are only Operator who organize with a Minimum of 02 people and Average of 04-06ppl and as Maximum of 08 ppl.

– Does Quechuas Expeditions take the route of Llactapata? and Humantay Lake?
Yes, this route is our plus to offer to everyone while many go to Santa Teresa town. W City and get a great view of the Mountains. and we also climb the beautiful lake of Humantay on the first day.

– Does Quechuas Expeditions offer Food for vegetarians and for those who don’t eat Gluten?
Yes, we do offer vegetarian Food with no extra cost (Please send us all your dietary requirements) and instead of wheat we use Quinua or Quiwicha.

– What is the difference that Quechuas Expeditions is offering on theirs tours compared to others?

Private Transportation Cusco – Mollepata – Marcocasa (trail head) we skip the 1st dusty road part.
3 (4 season aluminum poles tents) We never use fiber weak poles tents as most
4 Therm-a-rest self inflating pads with no extra cost.
5 Private Transfer from Ollantaytambo to cusco and then you will be transferred
6 We are Taking the Inca Trail to Llactapata and get a great view of Machupicchu.

What happens if Quechuas Expeditions does not get the Minimum Group Size?
We require a minimum of 02 people to depart. We have always managed to meet the minimum group size for all of our departure dates and have never canceled a trip. If we do not reach the minimum number of people required for a trek, we reserve the right to combine our clients with other organizations for the trek to meet the minimum group size.
We require just 02 persons to depart. During the last 5 years Quechuas Expeditions has always managed to meet the minimum group size for ALL of our departure dates and have never had to cancel any group departures or have to combine with any other trekking company or accept clients from any other trekking company in Cusco.
However if in the event that we do not reach the minimum required number of persons we reserve the right to combine our clients with another trekking company of similar or higher cost. Unlike many other trekking agencies, including some of the most expensive, we will not re-sell your trek to a cheaper, inferior company. There will be NO trek surcharge when combining with a more expensive trekking company as Quechuas Expeditions will accept responsibility for this extra cost. However we cannot guarantee that trekking staff used by other companies will receive the same treatment and high pay as provided by Quechuas Expeditions, although we do our best.

– What happens if I get sick on Salkantay Trek?
We will evaluate your symptoms and treat you accordingly.
We carry basic medical supplies on the trail, however, we recommend that you also bring your own supply of medicine. If your symptoms are considered poor enough for you to continue the trek, we will have a porter accompany you back to Cusco where you can seek further medical treatment. Unfortunately, you will be responsible for all expenses occurred during your transport back to Cusco (for example, the bus ticket).

If you are feeling better, we will help you get to Aguas Calientes so you can participate in the guided tour of MachuPicchu.

– What happens if I arrive at Machu Picchu and then decide to stay an extra night, can I change my train ticket?

It is still possible to make changes to your return train ticket if you decide to stay an extra night at Aguas Calientes. You will have to take your train ticket personally to the train station in Aguas Calientes and ask them to change the return date of your ticket. You will probably be asked to pay an extra US$10 administration fee and changing the ticket will be subject to availability of spaces on the train on the following day.

– How cold are the Salkantay camping Spot?

All of our former trekkers agree that the coldest campsite along the trek is the first base-camp: Soraypampa base-camp. During the nighttime, temperatures can drop below freezing. This is especially true during the months of June, July, and August. However, the second and third campsites are semi tropical climate.

The altitude means it can get quite chilly, especially during the Andean winter (May – September) when the temperature can drop to below zero degrees (Celsius) at night. It can still be cool at other times of the year and so we recommend bringing thermal underwear and a warm sleeping bag. You can purchase warm, inexpensive and locally made hand-woven mitts and gloves in Cusco.

– What training do you provide for your staff on environmental practices?

Our guide teams have been trained in first aid and rescue and are regularly updated through seminars and courses in their respective fields. All of our trekking staff receives regular briefings on how to best comply with the Salcantay Trek Trail and Machu Picchu Sanctuary Regulations as well as on environmental awareness.

We are great believers in leaving the areas that we visit in as untouched a condition as is possible. We encourage everyone who travels with us to respect the land, the people, and their fellow travelers. This type of focus leads to amazing experiences and insights that bring a sense of satisfaction, which is difficult to create any other way, so be thinking responsibility, consideration, and FUN!.

– What you do to minimize environmental impacts on the Salkantay Trek?

Our Environmental Management Policy and Commitment considers running our operations in a responsible way, according to the following:
* Selective disposal of garbage (organic & inorganic)
* Garbage withdrawal of Natural Protected Areas
* We provide toilet tents with chemical toilet facilities. All garbage is disposed of outside the Natural Protected Areas
* Avoid fires – no smoking allowed inside the tents
* Use of bowls for washing purposes to avoid the soap from being thrown over to the floor or to natural water sources
* Avoid disturbing animals
* No animal hunting allowed
* Preservation of the flora, no orchid taking allowed
* Walking over the Inca ruins, walls or archaeological sites is absolutely forbidden.

– What type of Hotel does Quechuas Expeditions Include for their treks?

At Quechuas Expeditions, we always offer the Pumas Inn – Sumaq Muyurina. These hotels offer comfortable beds, hot water for showering, and a buffet breakfast.
NOTE: We guarantee these hostels per the itinerary if you book your trek in 2 months in advance, otherwise we may be forced to offer substitutes.

– Can I upgrade the hotel in Aguas Calientes?

There are two way to upgrade your accommodation in Aguas Calientes:
1.) Tell us what type hotel are interesting in book.
2.) Book your own accommodation.
Important: In both of the alternatives  we will give a $20 discount per person and you can use this money to upgrade your accommodation.

–  When do I need to make a trek reservation?
Salkantay Trek permits are not required for this trek so in theory you could just turn up in Cusco and book this trek a day or two in advance. However the train tickets from Aguas Calientes and back to Ollantaytambo at the end of the trek are becoming more and more difficult for us to purchase at short notice and it is highly recommended that these tickets are bought at least 2 months before trek departure.
The number of spaces within the group are also limited so if you have limited time in Cusco and you really want to do this trek then we would recommend making a trek booking as far in advance as possible.

– How far in advance do I need to make a trek reservation?
For the Salkantay Trail, As far in advance as possible. Because our company has strictly limited the number of people in our group Size( 8 people). We therefore recommend that you try to make your Salkantay reservation as far in advance as possible as soon as you know the dates of your international flights. The list of available trek spaces is shown on our Salkantay Trek main page and is updated 2 or 3 times a week. As long as dates are shown available then you can make a trek booking. Dates that have been crossed out have been closed either because they are fully booked or because the limited number of trek permits remaining on this day have dropped to a dangerously low level so we have stopped taking further bookings (even though the group is not full) and have had to buy the trek permits for the group.

We have included recommendations below as a guide as to when to make a trek booking.
Nov, Dec, Jan & March: Reservation should be made at least 2 months in advance
April, May, June, Jul, Aug, Sept, Oct: In 2010 most trek permits were sold out between 2 and 3 months in advance. In 2007 we therefore recommend making a reservation at least 3 months in advance, although 5 months is recommended.

– How to Book Passes to Climb Huayna Picchu?
Climbing HuaynaPicchu mountain is a unique experience and provides a different perspective than from Intipunku (the Sun Gate). It takes approximately 45 minutes to climb.
If you want to include an ascent of Huayna Picchu in your visit to Machu Picchu, note that The trail to Huayna Picchu is safe but very vertical and is about an hour and a half round trip. Beware that there are new regulations since July 2011 and permits have to be bought in advance. The cost to have a Machu Picchu entrance that includes the permit to climb Huayna Picchu is $80 if you want us to organize your permit to climb Huayna Picchu and we must have this request in writing and confirmed at the time of your booking indicating you will pay the extra 20$ for this permit.
There is a limit of only 400 permits for climbing Huayna Picchu and only 200 people are permitted to enter for each of the 2 sessions scheduled for 7am and 10 am.
The guide will organize the tour of Machu Picchu around peoples climb of Huayna Picchu depending on how many in the group have permits.
Please note your entrance to Machu Picchu and permit for Huayna Picchu are with your name and passport details so are non transferable and non refundable.
Please let us know as soon as possible if you would like to climb HuaynaPicchu. Please specify if you would like the ticket from 7am – 8am or from 10am – 11am.

– 10 – When is the best time to do Salkantay?
Dry season runs from May to November and this is typically the time that is most recommended. However, this is also the cooler time of year. Nighttime temperatures can drop to below freezing at the height of the dry season.
June, July and August are the most popular months to visit so you will tend to encounter much larger crowds during these months.
In the wet season (December to April), you can expect showers three to four afternoons a week. For travelers that don’t mind a little drizzle and muddy trails, this time of year offers smaller crowds and greener hillsides, with wildflowers and orchids often in bloom.
The shoulder seasons, April to June or September to November can often provide the best of both worlds. They typically have fewer crowds and warmer temperatures than the height of the dry season, but still tend to have relatively little rain

EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT OUR QUECHUAS EXPEDITIONS COMPANY:
We are a professional agency, and take care for our environment when we are working with groups and we provide a complete catered and guided service of the highest quality.
Quechuas Expeditions, has many years experience organizing tours & treks and only employ quality & responsible staff who you can trust. Our administration base is in Cusco.

Our tour service and client support in Cusco is managed by our agency, we are TOUR OPERATORS,
–  We are committed to departing with 02 of you on our Tours we will never pass you onto another Cheap Tour operator!
– We depart even if you are 02 people.
– We are the sole operators of all our tours!

Our Staff:
All the guides we use are certified and issued licenses by the Cuzco Tour Guides Association and our guides are trained every year.
We do not employ unlicensed or unaccredited guides and staff.

– How many days do I need to acclimatize before the Salkantay trek?

It is really important to be well acclimated to the altitude before exerting yourself on a trek.

ACCLIMATIZATION
We do recommend that you arrive in Cuzco at least 2 days before the trek departs to help you become acclimatized to the altitude and avoid possible problems with altitude illness while on trek. All treks from Cuzco gain altitude quickly on the first day(s) with some treks gaining more than 1000m in altitude in a single day and it is important to be well acclimatized before commencing the trek.
It is advisable to have two full days in Cuzco to recover from your travel and to do at least one day hike to higher altitudes help with acclimatization. We can organize day hikes & other tours around Cuzco for you.
If you have already been in another area of Peru at high altitude before arriving in Cuzco, we still recommend you have a complete day in Cuzco to rest, recover from your travel and enjoy the sights and sounds of Cuzco before departing for the trek.
To avoid altitude sickness on the trek, we recommend that you spend time in Cusco or in the Sacred Valley. If you have never been in high altitude, we recommend that you spend a day in the Sacred Valley because it is at lower altitude than Cusco city.

Prevention of altitude sickness
Climbers should be informed of the risks, symptoms and treatments for altitude sickness. If the ascent is to take place in a remote mountain it is important to be prepared and to take precautions.
Acclimatization – the best way to prevent altitude sickness is to ascend gradually, so that your body can become acclimatized to the changing altitude. Plan the acclimatization and make sure your trip includes enough time for this. Make sure everyone in the group is fully acclimatized before ascending.
Vacation packages – beware of vacation packages that promise to ascend a mountain in just a few days.
Fluids – consume between 4 to 6 liters of water per day.
Food – eat a high calorie diet while at high altitude.
Worsening symptoms – if moderate altitude symptoms worsen you should descend immediately.
Sleeping – when your altitude is over 3,000 meters, ascend no more than 300 meters each night. In other words, do not sleep at more than 300 meters higher than you slept the previous night. Even if you ascend more than 300 meters during the day, before going to sleep come back down so that you are no more than 300 meters higher than the night before when you go to sleep.
Smoking – do not smoke.
Alcohol – do not consume alcoholic drinks.
Acetazolamide/Dexamethasone – these medications can also be used to prevent altitude sickness.
Moderate symptoms – people with moderate symptoms should stay at their current altitude until their symptoms have gone completely.
Other medications – some medications may make symptoms worse while at high altitude, or ascending, including tranquilizers and sleeping pills.

– What is the best thing to do in the event of altitude sickness?
Wherever possible “go down”. The important things are to have gradual ascent, time to adjust, rest days, and someone who can recognize early problems. All these requirements are features of this trek. If you are staying in Cusco, you may still feel the effects.
The best advice is to sleep, take plenty of fluids or you could also try coca tea.
The porters chew coca leaves wrapped around a black resin called “llipta”.
When you are actually walking and active (especially on day two of the trail), this may help since it dilates the blood vessels and carries oxygen to the parts of the body that need it.

Altitude Sickness
Altitude sickness, also called acute mountain sickness (AMS), altitude illness, hypobaropathy, Acosta disease,puna, or soroche is a disorder caused by being at high altitude where air pressure is low without prior acclimatization (the process of gradual exposure). If it does occur, it will do so at altitudes above 8,000 feet (2,500 meters) – 8000 meters is a common height for many ski resorts. More severe symptoms generally occur at above 3,600 meters (about 12,000 feet). Acute mountain sickness can progress to high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) or high altitude cerebral edema (HACE).

Altitude Sickness Symptoms.
Symptoms of acute altitude sickness include:

  • headaches
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • lethargy
  • poor sleep
  • loss of appetite

– What are the causes of altitude sickness?
The main cause of altitude sickness is ascending too rapidly. It may also be caused by going too high and staying there for too long. The human body needs to adapt to the lower air pressure and decreased levels of oxygen – for that it needs a gradual progression (acclimatization).
The average human body needs from 1 to 3 days to get acclimatized to a change in altitude. People who do not spend enough time acclimatizing to a new altitude before going further up have the highest risk of developing altitude sickness.
Altitude sickness – our body’s response to a lower oxygen supply to the muscles and brain – can become a serious and fatal condition.
If there is less oxygen in the blood, the heart and lungs have to work harder, raising the pulse and breathing rates. More red blood cells are made to enable the body to carry more oxygen. As our bodies respond to a change in altitude our blood acidity level, lung pressure, electrolyte levels and fluid and salt balance change.
Diagnosing altitude sickness
If a person has climbed to an altitude above 2,500 feet, they have a headache plus at least one of the symptoms listed above, then an accurate diagnosis is fairly straightforward.
The first symptoms of altitude sickness tend to be a headache, light-headedness, exhaustion, insomnia and stomach upset. Anyone who develops these symptoms should immediately stop ascending, or even go down to a lower level and rest until symptoms have completely gone.

– What are the treatment options for altitude sickness?
The signs and symptoms of altitude sickness should not be ignored, because the potential complications of the condition could be fatal. Death from altitude sickness used to be much more common in the past; mainly because people did not spot the signs or symptoms (or decided to ignore them).
People with very mild symptoms may continue ascending, but at a much slower pace. It is important to let others know the symptoms are there, no matter how mild they might be.

People with slightly more severe symptoms should:

  • Rest completely
  • Consume plenty of (non-alcoholic) fluids
  • Not smoke

Descending – descending to a lower altitude is probably the best thing to do if symptoms develop. Attempts to treat or stabilize the patient in situ at altitude is dangerous, unless highly controlled and with good medical facilities. People with moderate symptoms usually respond well if they descent just 1,000 feet (300 meters) and stay there for 24 hours. If the individual with moderate symptoms remains at this lower altitude for a couple of days their body will have become acclimatized and they can then start ascending again.
People with severe symptoms should descend at least 2,000 feet (600 meters) as soon as possible. If this is not done quickly there is a risk of serious of life-threatening complications. People whose symptoms do not improve after descending 600 meters should go down further until they start feeling better.
Pure oxygen – giving pure oxygen to a person with severe breathing problems caused by altitude sickness can help. Oxygen is commonly provided by physicians at mountain resorts.
Gamow bag – this is used when a rapid descent is not possible. It is a portable plastic hyperbaric chamber inflated with a foot pump. It can be used to reduce the effective altitude by up to 1,500 meters (5,000 feet). It is usually used as an aid to evacuate patients with severe symptoms, not to treat them at high altitude.
Coca plant – this is a folk remedy for altitude sickness in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. A tea is made from the coca plant.
Painkillers – Tylenol (paracetamol) or ibuprofen can be taken for headaches.
Acetazolamide – this medication corrects the chemical imbalance in the blood caused by altitude sickness, as well as accelerating the patient’s breathing rate. If the person can breathe more quickly their body will have more oxygen, resulting in an alleviation of some symptoms, such as nausea, dizziness and headache. This medication has some possible side effects, including pins-and-needles on the face, fingers and toes, excessive urination, and blurred vision (rare).

Prevention of altitude sickness
Climbers should be informed of the risks, symptoms and treatments for altitude sickness. If the ascent is to take place in a remote mountain it is important to be prepared and to take precautions.
Acclimatization – the best way to prevent altitude sickness is to ascend gradually, so that your body can become acclimatized to the changing altitude. Plan the acclimatization and make sure your trip includes enough time for this. Make sure everyone in the group is fully acclimatized before ascending.
Vacation packages – beware of vacation packages that promise to ascend a mountain in just a few days.
Fluids – consume between 4 to 6 liters of water per day.
Food – eat a high calorie diet while at high altitude.
Worsening symptoms – if moderate altitude symptoms worsen you should descend immediately.
Sleeping – when your altitude is over 3,000 meters, ascend no more than 300 meters each night. In other words, do not sleep at more than 300 meters higher than you slept the previous night. Even if you ascend more than 300 meters during the day, before going to sleep come back down so that you are no more than 300 meters higher than the night before when you go to sleep.
Smoking – do not smoke.
Alcohol – do not consume alcoholic drinks.
Acetazolamide/Dexamethasone – these medications can also be used to prevent altitude sickness.
Moderate symptoms – people with moderate symptoms should stay at their current altitude until their symptoms have gone completely.
Other medications – some medications may make symptoms worse while at high altitude, or ascending, including tranquilizers and sleeping pills.

– Do I need to bring hiking boots & walking Poles?
Hiking boots are highly recommended, as they provide ankle support that reduces the risk of injury, especially when trekking in the wet season (December to March) as you will encounter a lot of mud and rocks. It is also important that your boots are comfortable and well worn-in.
Many people prefer to trek in tennis shoes but extra care should be taken. We do not recommend trekking in sandals, using new boots, or renting boots prior to the trek. Make sure the shoes are sturdy enough for the duration of the trek and will not fall apart.

– Can I use trekking poles on the Salkantay trek ?
Many people like hiking with trekking poles or walking sticks as they provide stability and support when trekking on rocky terrain. Recently, government authorities have stopped trekkers from using wooden sticks that could have come from local forests to prevent deforestation of the protected Andean region.

– Are there toilets on the Salkantay Trail?
Welcome to Quechuas Expeditions.
Quechuas Expeditions, is an adventure trekking specialist that offers unique experiences to little known wilderness places.
Quechuas Expeditions, since 2006, offers creative and innovative ideas to allow the maximum enjoyment of the richness of our country, providing an agile, personalized and efficient service, with the backing of professionals of vast experience in the field of tourism.
Our tours are led by knowledgeable professional guides who will help you explore Salkantay Mountain. We customize from simple to specialized itineraries covering any particular interests and activities.
The top-quality professional preparation of our personnel (guides and counters), besides the high quality standards in choosing our providers, have always guaranteed customers satisfaction.
Our adventure hikes are specifically and carefully designed, and you will find many of them ONLY on this site.
We are specialists in Inca Trail alternate (or alternative) routes, so if you have missed out on a place on the Classic Inca Trail then you have come to the right place to find some great Inca Trail alternatives and options.
Trekking in the Andes is a passion for us – which we would like to share with you. We highly recommend these alternative treks to Machu Picchu (and other locations) as a wonderful way to get off the beaten track and experience the real Peru.
Find all the information you need to plan your trip to Peru – we are specialists in Peru adventure travel. We have the most frequent departures of any agency in Cusco on the challenging 5 day Salkantay to Machu Picchu route!
Among the services offered by the company stands out the coordination of itineraries for individuals or groups, including hotel reservations, transport, tours, car rentals, logistical support activities and any other special requirements necessary.
We always work thinking of you, of your needs, but above all, of your expectations. We know that every detail is important, and for this reason make our best…

– If I am traveling alone can I have my own tent?
If you are traveling alone and are willing to share a tent with a member of the same sex, then there is no additional cost. If there is no one of the same sex, you will receive a tent of your own at not additional cost. However, if you would like your own tent and are unwilling to share, then there is an additional charge of US$40.

How many people can fit in each tent?
There are two people per tent and Plenty of space for personal stuff

– Is the Salkantay trek difficult?
All of the treks are fairly difficult and you should be well prepared and healthy prior to starting the trek. You have to be moderately fit to complete this hike. Try walking 10km in a day or go to the gym a month before the trek because we will cover a lot of distance in the first 2 days.
The Salkantay Trek is a 50km hike through mountainous regions. The maximum altitude reached is 4600m above sea level. You should be well prepared and healthy prior to starting it. You have to be moderately fit and take regular exercise. Try walking 15km in a day or go to the gym in the months leading up to the trek. It is also important to be well acclimatized to the altitude. Try to spend 2 or 3 days in Cusco (3400m) prior to starting the trek. This time can be put to good use visiting the city of Cusco, nearby Inca ruins and the Sacred Valley of the Incas.
Note: It is really important to be well acclimatized to the altitude. Try to spend two or three days in Cusco (3400m/11220ft) prior to starting the trek. This time can be put to good use visiting the city of Cusco, the nearby Inca ruins, and the Sacred Valley.
The second day of the trek will be the longest and hardest. After an early breakfast, we will start hiking up a moderate climb for three and half hours until we reach the Salkantay Pass (4,650m/15,092ft). From this point, we can soak in spectacular views of Cusco’s second highest peak. At the pass, you can leave a piece of rock carried from the bottom as a present for the mountain spirit.

– Salkantay Trek Map
Cusco covers a total area of 70,015.30 Km2. In this beautiful land, it is possible to find colorful Andean valleys, snowy peaks, rivers, waterfalls, the beautiful Andean jungle, Inca and pre-Inca sites, and several Andean communities. These Andean communities are connected by thousands of paths. Some of these paths have been used before the Spaniards arrived to Peru. One of these paths is the one connecting the Andean valley of Mollepata with the Santa Teresa town located in the Andean Jungle. This path is well-known as the Salkantay Trek. After the Inca Trail, the Salkantay Trek is the most beautiful and popular one. Indeed, the magazine National Geographic Adventure rated the Salkantay Trek as one of the best 25 treks all over the world.

– Salkantay Trek Most Importanta List of Things?
During the trek your main luggage will be stored at your hotel in Cuzco and you will receive a small duffle bag at your briefing (which will be held the evening before you start the trek) to pack clothes for 3-4 days. Your team of porters or horseman will carry these bags together with the food and equipment for the trail.
Please note that you will not have access to these items until the end of each day as the horseman will always be ahead of the group. You should therefore bring a day pack in which you can carry personal belongings such as your camera, water and sun screen etc. By Peruvian law the duffle bag must not weigh more than 7 kilograms (15lbs) which is to include your sleeping bag. All bags will be weighed before being accepted. If you require more than 7 kilograms, it will then be your responsibility to carry the extra amount together with your day pack.

–  Packing List for the Salkantay Trek
Please note: During the Salkantay trek even daytime temperatures can become extremely cold with a wind chill factor, especially on day 2 crossing the high passes.
* Original International Student Identity Card (in case you have applied for a student discount)
* One sleeping bag per person: our sleeping bags are -18ºC-comfort (0ºF), mummy form and include a sleeping liner. They are cleaned after every use and have a maximum usage of 30 trips, can also be hired in our office for US$30.
* One pillow per person
* Thermarest pads are provided with no extra cost.
* Well worn-in waterproof walking boots: Good quality, comfortable footwear is essential. Whatever you wear on your feet the most important thing is comfort. It is vital to ensure your boots are well worn in and lightweight.
* Waterproof clothing: A plastic poncho is recommended and can be purchased easily for approx US$1.
* A backpack with a change of clothes for the whole period of the trek
* Rain gear (jacket and pants if available) or rain poncho (plastic ponchos can be purchased in Cusco)
* Strong footwear, waterproof trekking boots recommended
* Sandals or jogging shoes for a higher comfort while at camp
* Warm clothes, including jacket, fleeces. Thermal clothing is also recommended, especially for sleeping
* Flashlight/headlamp and batteries
* Camera, films and batteries (batteries consume more quickly under cold conditions)
* Hat or cap to protect you from the sun, rain and cold
* Sun block
* After-sun cream or hydrating cream for face and body
* Insect repellent – minimum recommended 20% DEET – no malaria risk has been reported
* Handkerchiefs
* Toilet paper
* Snacks: biscuits, energy bars, chocolate, raw fruits, muesli, etc. Please note that we do provide a daily morning snack and our meal service is very complete and well supplied. This recommendation applies for all clients being used to a specific snack, as it may happen that it is not included in our selection
* Water container and water for the first morning. Important notice: plastic water bottles are no longer allowed into Machu Picchu. Plastic water containers (ie. Nalgene) or metal ones are recommended
* Optionally: water- sterilizing tablets in case you pick up water from streams or rivers along the route. Otherwise, we provide filtered boiled water, which is safe to drink and has not reported any health problem so far
Small towel
* Swimsuit (if you wish to go to the hot springs in Aguas Calientes)
* Cash in soles and/or US$
* Optional: walking sticks or poles (rubber covers required in order not to damage archaeological sites)

Very Important Documents
* Original Passports & Travel Insurance (copy of this)
* Salkantay Trek Map (Will be provided at the time of briefing)
* Original International Student Identity Card ISIC (in case you have applied for a student discount)

–  What do I need to bring on the trek?

What we Recommended that you Carry?
– A backpack with a change of clothes for the whole period of the trek
– Rain gear (jacket and pants if available) or rain poncho (plastic ponchos can be purchased in Cusco)
– Strong footwear, waterproof trekking boots recommended
– Sandals or jogging shoes for a higher comfort while at camp
– Warm clothes, including jacket, fleeces. Thermal clothing is also recommended, especially for sleeping
– Flashlight/headlamp and batteries
– Camera, films and batteries (batteries consume more quickly under cold conditions)
– Hat or cap to protect you from the sun, rain and cold
– Sun block
– After-sun cream or hydrating cream for face and body
– Insect repellent – minimum recommended 20% DEET – no malaria risk has been reported
– Handkerchiefs
– Toilet paper
– Snacks: biscuits, energy bars, chocolate, raw fruits, muesli, etc. Please note that we do provide a daily morning snack and our meal service is very complete and well supplied. This recommendation applies for all clients being used to a specific snack, as it may happen that it is not included in our selection
– Water container and water for the first morning. Important notice: plastic water bottles are no longer allowed into Machu Picchu. Plastic water containers (ie. Nalgene) or metal ones are recommended
Optionally: water- sterilizing tablets in case you pick up water from streams or rivers along the route. Otherwise, we provide filtered boiled water, which is safe to drink and has not reported any health problem so far
– Small towel
– Swimsuit (if you wish to go to the hot springs in Aguas Calientes)
– Cash in soles and/or US$
– Original passport
– Original International Student Identity Card (in case you have applied for a student discount)
– Optional: walking sticks or poles (rubber covers required in order not to damage archaeological sites).

Salkantay Trek Recommendations
If you have decided to hike the Salkantay Trek, please make sure you read this section. The Salkantay is a beautiful trek covering Andean valleys, snowy peaks, the Andean jungle, and Machu Picchu. This amazing trek is considered a moderate to difficult hike for which you need to be prepared.
First, the Salkantay Trek covers a total distance of about 55.5 miles (89 kilometers) – the Short version is about 10.5 miles (or 17 kilometers) shorter  – and reaches a maximum elevation of about 14,760 f.a.s.l. (4,600 m.a.s.l.). The trek starts at about 9,180 f.a.s.l. (2,850 m.a.s.l.) which means that in one day and a half, you will gain an elevation of about  5,580 f.a.s.l. (1,750 m.a.s.l.) These are two good reasons to be in good physical shape and used to the altitude of a high altitude city such as Cusco before starting the trek. It is recommended that you stay in Cusco or another high altitude city a couple of full days prior to starting the trek. In addition, you might choose to  take high altitude sickness pills or chew coca leaves during the trek. If you get the symptoms of altitude sickness (strong headache, nausea, stomachache, and sometimes nose bleeding), try to drink a lot of liquid, and either have a very light meal or eat nothing at all.  You should  be feeling better the next day.
Second, since you will be hiking through several ecological steps, you will be encountering different climates and will need to be ready for it. For instance, the first day will be sunny in the beginning and very cold at night (below freezing) with almost no chance of rain.
The second day will be below freezing in the morning, windy at midday with a low possibility of rain, and cool at night.
The third day will be warm during the day and cool at night with a possibility of rain.
The fourth day will be cool at morning with a possibility of rain and warm at midday. All these weather changes require you to bring the necessary gear to make this trek an enjoyable experience. Some of the basic gear you should bring are an impermeable or rain poncho, waterproof hiking boots, sun screen, hiking hat, sun glasses, light jacket, warm jacket, long and short sleeves shirts, gloves, hat, wool socks, thermal underwear and a good sleeping bag (good for 15 Fahrenheit degrees or less).
Third, campsites are dark at night so make sure you have a good flashlight. The sky at night is spectacular and if you want to spend a while outside looking at the stars, please make sure you have a good supply of batteries.

Finally, remember to bring insect repellent, a bathing suit, a small backpack to be carried during the day, an adventurous attitude and lots of energy.

Finally:
Remember to bring insect repellent, a bathing suit, a small backpack to be carried during the day, an adventurous attitude and lots of energy.
In order to fully enjoy this once in a time experience, we recommend that you  follow these instructions. Travel Insurance is highly recommended for this trip and a copy of it may be requested.
Please keep in mind that our horses will carry up to 17.6 pounds or 8 kilograms of your personal belongings. If you bring more weight, we recommend that you to hire a personal horse.

Checking list for the Salkantay Trek
Well broken hiking shoes, a good jacket, a sleeping bag for low temperatures (as low as 28ºF), an impermeable, and sun   screen should be your priority when hiking in the Peruvian Andes. In the Andes and high jungle weather is sometimes unpredictable.
The following items should be brought to the trek: Waterproof shoes, sleeping bag for low temperatures, gloves, cotton hat, thermal socks, day hat, heavy jacket, light jacket and impermeable, long sleeve shirts, hiking pants, t-shirts, underwear, sun glasses, tennis shoes or sandals to be used at the campsites, small first aid kit, toilet paper, sun screen, insect repellant, flashlight, and water container.
You might consider the following items: Snacks, energy bars, walking sticks (Rustic walking sticks can be purchased before starting the trek), sealable bags, wet wipes, water purification pills, altitude sickness pills and camera.
Please make sure to bring your personal medication to the trek as well as stomachache pills, diarrhea pills, and headache pills.

– Salkantay Trek Preparations

What we Recommended that you Carry?
– A backpack with a change of clothes for the whole period of the trek
– Rain gear (jacket and pants if available) or rain poncho (plastic ponchos can be purchased in Cusco)
– Strong footwear, waterproof trekking boots recommended
– Sandals or jogging shoes for a higher comfort while at camp
– Warm clothes, including jacket, fleeces. Thermal clothing is also recommended, especially for sleeping
– Flashlight/headlamp and batteries
– Camera, films and batteries (batteries consume more quickly under cold condition
– Hat or cap to protect you from the sun, rain and cold
– Sun block
– After-sun cream or hydrating cream for face and body
– Insect repellent – minimum recommended 20% DEET – no malaria risk has been reported
– Handkerchiefs
– Toilet paper
– Snacks: biscuits, energy bars, chocolate, raw fruits, muesli, etc. Please note that we do provide a daily morning snack and our meal service is very complete and well supplied. This recommendation applies for all clients being used to a specific snack, as it may happen that it is not included in our selection
– Water container and water for the first morning. Important notice: plastic water bottles are no longer allowed into Machu Picchu. Plastic water containers (ie. Nalgene) or metal ones are recommended
Optionally: water- sterilizing tablets in case you pick up water from streams or rivers along the route. Otherwise, we provide filtered boiled water, which is safe to drink and has not reported any health problem so far

– Small towel
– Swimsuit (if you wish to go to the hot springs in Aguas Calientes)
– Cash in soles and/or US$
– Original passport
– Original International Student Identity Card (in case you have applied for a student discount)
– Optional: walking sticks or poles (rubber covers required in order not to damage archaeological sites).

Salkantay Trek Recommendations
If you have decided to hike the Salkantay Trek, please make sure you read this section. The Salkantay is a beautiful trek covering Andean valleys, snowy peaks, the Andean jungle, and Machu Picchu. This amazing trek is considered a moderate to difficult hike for which you need to be prepared.
First, the Salkantay Trek covers a total distance of about 55.5 miles (89 kilometers) – the Short version is about 10.5 miles (or 17 kilometers) shorter  – and reaches a maximum elevation of about 14,760 f.a.s.l. (4,600 m.a.s.l.). The trek starts at about 9,180 f.a.s.l. (2,850 m.a.s.l.) which means that in one day and a half, you will gain an elevation of about  5,580 f.a.s.l. (1,750 m.a.s.l.) These are two good reasons to be in good physical shape and used to the altitude of a high altitude city such as Cusco before starting the trek. It is recommended that you stay in Cusco or another high altitude city a couple of full days prior to starting the trek. In addition, you might choose to  take high altitude sickness pills or chew coca leaves during the trek. If you get the symptoms of altitude sickness (strong headache, nausea, stomachache, and sometimes nose bleeding), try to drink a lot of liquid, and either have a very light meal or eat nothing at all.  You should  be feeling better the next day.

Second, since you will be hiking through several ecological steps, you will be encountering different climates and will need to be ready for it. For instance, the first day will be sunny in the beginning and very cold at night (below freezing) with almost no chance of rain. The second day will be below freezing in the morning, windy at midday with a low possibility of rain, and cool at night. The third day will be warm during the day and cool at night with a possibility of rain. The fourth day will be cool at morning with a possibility of rain and warm at midday. All these weather changes require you to bring the necessary gear to make this trek an enjoyable experience. Some of the basic gear you should bring are an impermeable or rain poncho, waterproof hiking boots, sun screen, hiking hat, sun glasses, light jacket, warm jacket, long and short sleeves shirts, gloves, hat, wool socks, thermal underwear and a good sleeping bag (good for 15 Fahrenheit degrees or less).

Third, campsites are dark at night so make sure you have a good flashlight. The sky at night is spectacular and if you want to spend a while outside looking at the stars, please make sure you have a good supply of batteries.

Finally, remember to bring insect repellent, a bathing suit, a small backpack to be carried during the day, an adventurous attitude and lots of energy.

Finally:
Remember to bring insect repellent, a bathing suit, a small backpack to be carried during the day, an adventurous attitude and lots of energy.
In order to fully enjoy this once in a time experience, we recommend that you  follow these instructions. Travel Insurance is highly recommended for this trip and a copy of it may be requested.
Please keep in mind that our horses will carry up to 17.6 pounds or 8 kilograms of your personal belongings. If you bring more weight, we recommend that you to hire a personal horse.

Checking list for the Salkantay Trek
Well broken hiking shoes, a good jacket, a sleeping bag for low temperatures (as low as 28ºF), an impermeable, and sun   screen should be your priority when hiking in the Peruvian Andes. In the Andes and high jungle weather is sometimes unpredictable.
The following items should be brought to the trek: Waterproof shoes, sleeping bag for low temperatures, gloves, cotton hat, thermal socks, day hat, heavy jacket, light jacket and impermeable, long sleeve shirts, hiking pants, t-shirts, underwear, sun glasses, tennis shoes or sandals to be used at the campsites, small first aid kit, toilet paper, sun screen, insect repellant, flashlight, and water container.
You might consider the following items: Snacks, energy bars, walking sticks (Rustic walking sticks can be purchased before starting the trek), sealable bags, wet wipes, water purification pills, altitude sickness pills and camera.
Please make sure to bring your personal medication to the trek as well as stomachache pills, diarrhea pills, and headache pills.

– What About drinking water?
We will provide boiled water to fill your bottle at meal times, although the water is clear always use sterilizing tablets and follow the instructions. The sterilizing tablets can be bought in most pharmacies in Cusco. With these tablets you have to wait between 30 and 40 minutes before drinking. Bottled mineral water can also be taken from Cusco or bought at Mollepata or Santa Teresa.
We recommend that you purchase a 1.5 – 2 liter bottle of water to take with you on the first day. Every night during the trek, we will boil water so you can refill the same bottle every morning before setting out. If you are planning to drink from any streams or waterfalls, we strongly suggest you bring water purification tablets or filters.
Also, you will be able to buy water along the way on Day 1, for the first few hours of Day 2, then again on the afternoon of Day 3, and of course at Machu Picchu.

– What is the difference between the 4 days & 5 Days Salkantay trek?
The 4 day will use a bus on the 3rd day from La Playa campsite to Hydroelectric train station. Then, you will take the train to Aguas Calientes. This use of transportation is reflected in the price of this trek.
You will not visit Santa Teresa and Cocalmayo Hot Spring that is offered for our company in the third day like a new option after 3 days of trekking.
The 5 day trek does not use extra transportation to get to Aguas Calientes. This trek walks the distance that the 4 day trek avoided.

–  What Type of train does Quechuas Expeditions Include?
Quechuas Expeditions Company  wants all of our tourist to enjoy as much time as possible at MachuPicchu (you deserve it after your long trek!) We always book the Expedition train on PeruRail which departs at 18:45pm.
With this Train(Expeditions Service), you will have all day to visit Machu Picchu and Huayna Picchu.
This train will arrive to Ollantaytambo at 20:20pm and you will be picked up by your driver. The driver will be holding a sign with your name on it so there is no confusion. You will be transported back to your hotel/hostel in Cusco, you will Arrive Approximately between 10:00pm – 10:30pm.
Vistadome Upgraded Train (Vistadome Panoramic windows)
(Expedition Tourist train service is included in your tour.) Vistadome train is an optional train returning from Aguas Calientes to Cusco extra of (US$60 per person. This service departs at 15:47 pm from Aguas Calientes Station and arrives at 17:30 pm to Ollantaytambo Train Station then 2 hours private vehicle to Cusco. If you want a Vistadome service you need to contact us directly on info@quechuasexpeditions.com for this to be done and confirmed to you or mark in your booking form when you book your trek.

– Can I book an earlier train At the end of my Salkantay trek?
You have to tell us, what type of train service you want to come back.

– Can I Also do Salkantay Trek in 3 days?
Yes, we can also organize Salkantay Trek 3 days(Please, note we take the same route
1st Day. Cusco – Mollepata – Soraypampa(where we start hiking) – Salkantay Pass – Huayracmachay
2nd Day. Huayracmachay – La playa (where we take 2 hours of a Local Transporation to Hydroelectric Train station) here we walk to Aguas Calientes where we do overnight in a hostel.
3rd Day: Machupicchu – Cusco.
prices are based on Number of people departing that date ( And we will advertise the day to get more people and make the price lower.)

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